Skip to content

Cart

Your cart is empty

Being categorized under "Mild" Eczema indicates that your skin encounters occasional symptoms characteristic of atopic dermatitis. These include infrequent itching, minor dryness, and mild redness. The skin barrier in mild eczema may be slightly impaired, which can lead to difficulties in retaining moisture and protecting against irritants and allergens. This impairment, while not severe, requires attention to prevent escalation. Specialized care focusing on barrier repair and symptom management is key.

Common Scenarios for Mild Eczema
  • Seasonal or Environmental Flare-ups: You might notice that certain times of the year or specific environmental factors trigger your eczema symptoms, though these flare-ups are relatively infrequent.
  • Early Stage Management: If you are newly diagnosed with eczema, you are likely still exploring effective ways to manage and understand your condition.
  • Long-standing, Intermittent Symptoms: You may have had eczema for some time but generally manage it well, though you still occasionally experience mild symptoms.

While mild eczema presents its unique challenges, it’s typically manageable with a well-structured skincare routine and the right products. Understanding the specific needs of your skin and addressing them methodically is the key to effective symptom control. With consistent care, it's possible to maintain your skin's health and work towards achieving a "Clear or Almost Clear" eczema status. Remember, each skin is unique, so personalizing your skincare approach is important for optimal management of your condition.

DETECZEMA - Mild Eczema

ACTIVE INGREDIENTS YOUR SKIN NEEDS

Lipid Bilayer Technology

Lipid bilayer technology in dermatology focuses on mimicking and reinforcing the skin's natural lipid barrier, which is vital for maintaining skin health and integrity. Here's a brief overview of the physiological effects and roles in managing various skin conditions:

Physiological Effects of Lipid Bilayer Technology:
  1. Reinforcement of Skin Barrier: Lipid bilayer technology aims to replicate the skin's natural barrier, particularly beneficial for damaged or compromised skin. This reinforcement helps in reducing transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and enhancing skin hydration.
  2. Restoration of Lipid Composition: It helps in replenishing the essential lipids that are often deficient in certain skin conditions, thereby restoring the skin's natural protective barrier.
  3. Improvement in Skin Texture and Hydration: By restoring the lipid bilayer, this technology improves skin texture and overall hydration, leading to healthier, more resilient skin.
  4. Reduction of Inflammation and Irritation: It can help in reducing inflammation and irritation, particularly in conditions where the skin barrier is compromised.
Role in Managing Dermatological Conditions:
  1. Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema): Lipid bilayer technology is particularly beneficial in managing eczema, as it helps in restoring the deficient skin barrier function, reducing dryness, and controlling flare-ups.
  2. Psoriasis: In psoriasis, where the skin barrier is also disrupted, this technology aids in hydrating the skin and reducing scaling.
  3. Aging Skin: The aging skin, which naturally loses lipids over time, benefits from lipid bilayer technology as it helps in maintaining skin hydration and elasticity.
  4. Dry Skin Conditions (Xerosis, Ichthyosis): Enhancing the skin’s lipid content can significantly improve symptoms of dryness and scaling in these conditions.
  5. Sensitive Skin: For sensitive skin types, lipid bilayer technology can provide a gentle and effective way to strengthen the skin barrier without causing irritation.
References:
  • Del Rosso, J. Q., & Levin, J. (2011). The Clinical Relevance of Maintaining the Functional Integrity of the Stratum Corneum in both Healthy and Disease-affected Skin. Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology.
  • Rawlings, A. V., & Harding, C. R. (2004). Moisturization and Skin Barrier Function. Dermatologic Therapy.
  • Man, M. Q., Xin, S. J., Song, S. P., Cho, S. Y., Zhang, X. J., Tu, C. X., ... & Elias, P. M. (2009). Variation of Skin Surface pH, Sebum Content and Stratum Corneum Hydration with Age and Gender in a Large Chinese Population. Skin Pharmacology and Physiology.

d-Panthenol

d-Panthenol's multifaceted effects on skin hydration, barrier strengthening, and wound healing make it a valuable component in the management of various dermatological conditions, from dry skin to post-procedure care.

d-Panthenol, also known as pro-vitamin B5, is a widely used ingredient in skincare and dermatological treatments due to its beneficial effects on the skin. Here's a brief overview of its physiological effects and roles in managing various skin conditions:

Physiological Effects of d-Panthenol:
  1. Hydration: d-Panthenol is a humectant, meaning it helps to attract and retain moisture in the skin. This leads to increased skin hydration, which can improve skin softness and elasticity.
  2. Wound Healing and Repair: It plays a role in the synthesis of lipids and proteins, essential for skin repair. d-Panthenol has been shown to accelerate re-epithelialization in wound healing.
  3. Anti-Inflammatory Effect: d-Panthenol can reduce inflammation, making it beneficial in treating skin irritations and erythema.
  4. Skin Barrier Strengthening: By enhancing the synthesis of lipids and proteins, d-Panthenol contributes to the strengthening of the skin's barrier function, protecting against irritants and environmental damage.
  5. Soothing and Softening: It soothes the skin and makes it feel softer and smoother, which can be particularly beneficial for dry or rough skin textures.
Role in Managing Dermatological Conditions:
  1. Minor Wounds and Skin Irritations: Due to its role in skin repair and anti-inflammatory properties, d-Panthenol is used in the treatment of minor wounds, cuts, and skin irritations.
  2. Dermatitis and Eczema: It helps in managing conditions like dermatitis and eczema by reducing inflammation and enhancing skin barrier function.
  3. Dry Skin Conditions (Xerosis): Its moisturizing properties make it effective in treating dry skin, providing relief from itching and scaling.
  4. Post-procedure Care: d-Panthenol is often used in post-procedure care, such as after laser treatments or chemical peels, to aid in skin recovery and reduce inflammation.
References
  • Proksch, E., & Nissen, H. P. (2002). Dexpanthenol enhances skin barrier repair and reduces inflammation after sodium lauryl sulphate-induced irritation. Journal of Dermatological Treatment.
  • Ebner, F., Heller, A., Rippke, F., & Tausch, I. (2002). Topical use of dexpanthenol in skin disorders. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology.
  • Camargo, F. B. Jr, Gaspar, L. R., & Maia Campos, P. M. B. G. (2011). Skin moisturizing effects of panthenol-based formulations. Journal of Cosmetic Science.

Medilan™

Medilan™'s unique formulation and hypoallergenic properties make it a valuable component in the management of various dermatological conditions, particularly for hydrating and soothing sensitive and dry skin.

Medilan™, a ultra-refined, hypoallergenic medical grade lanolin, has proven to be very beneficial for managing dermatological conditions. Below is a brief overview of its physiological effects and roles in managing various skin conditions:

Physiological Effects of Medilan™
  1. Emollient: Medilan™ is an excellent emollient, helping to soften and smooth the skin by retaining moisture. It creates an occlusive barrier, which reduces transepidermal water loss (TEWL).
  2. Moisturizing: It is highly effective in moisturizing dry and rough skin, enhancing skin hydration by trapping and sealing in moisture.
  3. Hypoallergenic: Medilan™ is ultra-purified to minimize the risk of allergic reactions, making it suitable for sensitive skin types.
  4. Wound Healing: Medilan™ aids in the healing process of minor cuts, abrasions, and burns by maintaining a moist wound environment.
  5. Skin Barrier Function: It enhances the skin's barrier function, protecting against environmental irritants and reducing the risk of skin infections.
  6. Lipid Replenishment: Medilan™ mimics the lipids found in human skin, helping to restore the lipid barrier of the skin, especially beneficial in dry and chapped skin conditions.
  7. Skin Penetration and Hydration: It has the ability to penetrate the skin and aid in water retention in the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, thus enhancing hydration.
  8. Occlusive Properties: Medilan™ helps in reducing transepidermal water loss by forming a barrier on the skin surface, thereby retaining moisture and improving skin barrier function.
Role in Managing Dermatological Conditions:
  1. Eczema and Dry Skin Conditions: Due to its soothing, hydrating, and occlusive properties, Medilan™ is a valuable ingredient in treating eczema and other dry skin conditions.
  2. Wound Healing: While primarily used for its emollient effects, the properties of Medilan™ also aid in the healing of minor wounds and skin irritations.
  3. Sensitive Skin Care: Its hypoallergenic nature makes it suitable for use in individuals with sensitive skin, reducing the risk of irritation or allergic reactions.
  4. Nipple Care in Breastfeeding: Soothes and heals cracked and sore nipples in breastfeeding mothers.
  5. Chapped Lips and Skin: It is effective in treating chapped lips and skin, providing a barrier that seals in moisture and protects from harsh weather conditions.
References
  • Lodén, M., & Maibach, H. I. (2000). Dry skin and moisturizers: chemistry and function. CRC Press.
  • Suleman, H., et al. (2000). Role of lanolin in managing eczema and dry skin conditions. Community Nurse.
  • DiNardo, J. C. (2000). Is lanolin allergy a myth? Dermatitis.
  • Stone, L. (2000). Medilan: a hypoallergenic lanolin for emollient therapy. British Journal of Nursing​​.
  • ResearchGate Article on Medilan™ highlighting its role in skin care and emollient therapy​​.

Hyaluronic acid

Hyaluronic acid (HA), is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan found throughout the body's connective, epithelial, and neural tissues. Most abundantly present in the skin, eyes, and synovial fluid, HA is renowned for its exceptional capacity to retain moisture — a single gram can hold up to six liters of water.

In skincare, the primary appeal of hyaluronic acid lies in its unparalleled hydrating abilities. As a humectant, HA attracts and retains moisture from the environment, thereby providing intense hydration to the skin. This hydrating property contributes significantly to maintaining skin plumpness, suppleness, and elasticity.

Beyond hydration, hyaluronic acid also plays a vital role in skin repair and regeneration. It supports the skin's healing and repair processes, and its anti-inflammatory properties make it beneficial in calming irritated skin. Moreover, HA's ability to promote the production of collagen, a crucial protein for skin elasticity, further underscores its anti-aging benefits.

The molecular size of hyaluronic acid influences its skin penetration and efficacy. High molecular weight HA remains on the skin's surface, providing hydration and forming a barrier against moisture loss. In contrast, low molecular weight HA penetrates deeper into the skin's layers, offering more profound hydrating and rejuvenating effects.

Hyaluronic acid's remarkable ability to hydrate, improve skin elasticity, aid in wound healing, and provide antioxidant protection makes it a valuable component in managing a variety of dermatological conditions, particularly those related to aging, dryness, and sensitive skin.

Physiological Effects of Hyaluronic acid
  1. Hydration: Hyaluronic acid is a powerful humectant that can hold up to 1000 times its weight in water, significantly enhancing skin hydration and leading to plumper, more hydrated skin.
  2. Skin Elasticity and Wrinkle Reduction: By increasing skin moisture, it improves skin elasticity, reduces the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, and gives the skin a more youthful appearance.
  3. Wound Healing: It plays a role in wound healing due to its ability to regulate inflammation levels and signal the body to build more blood vessels in the damaged area.
  4. Barrier Enhancement: Hyaluronic acid helps reinforce the skin's natural barriers, protecting against environmental factors and retaining moisture.
  5. Antioxidant Properties: It provides antioxidant defense against free-radical damage from the sun and pollution.
Role in Managing Dermatological Conditions
  1. Aging Skin: Its ability to reduce wrinkles and improve skin elasticity makes it popular in anti-aging skincare products.
  2. Dry Skin: Hyaluronic acid is beneficial in treating dry skin conditions by providing intense hydration.
  3. Wound Care: Its role in wound healing is leveraged in post-procedure care, such as after laser treatments, and in healing minor cuts and abrasions.
  4. Acne Scars: It can help in the treatment of acne scars by promoting skin regeneration and reducing inflammation.
  5. Sensitive Skin: Due to its gentle nature, hyaluronic acid is suitable for sensitive skin, providing hydration without causing irritation.
References
  • Papakonstantinou, E., Roth, M., & Karakiulakis, G. (2012). Hyaluronic acid: A key molecule in skin aging. Dermato-endocrinology.
  • Jegasothy, S. M., Zabolotniaia, V., & Bielfeldt, S. (2014). Efficacy of a new topical nano-hyaluronic acid in humans. The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology.
  • Wollina, U., & Abdel-Naser, M. B. (2019). Hyaluronic acid in the treatment and prevention of skin diseases: Molecular biological, pharmaceutical and clinical aspects. Skin Pharmacology and Physiology.

Humectants

Humectants are a vital component in skincare, particularly for conditions characterized by impaired skin barrier function and excessive dryness. Their ability to attract and retain moisture in the skin makes them invaluable in both therapeutic and preventive dermatology.

Physiological effects of humectants
  1. Moisture Attraction: Humectants draw moisture from the environment and the deeper layers of the skin to the outer layer (stratum corneum), enhancing skin hydration.
  2. Enhancing Skin Barrier Function: By improving skin hydration, humectants help to maintain and improve the skin's barrier function, protecting against irritants and reducing transepidermal water loss (TEWL).
  3. Skin Elasticity and Appearance: Improved hydration can enhance skin elasticity and reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, giving the skin a plumper and smoother look.
  4. Soothing Effect: Humectants can have a soothing effect on the skin, particularly in conditions involving dryness or irritation.
Role in managing dermatological conditions
  1. Dry Skin (Xerosis): Humectants are key ingredients in many moisturizers and are highly effective in managing dry skin by providing and maintaining hydration.
  2. Eczema and Dermatitis: Their moisturizing and soothing properties help in relieving symptoms of eczema and dermatitis, such as dryness, itching, and irritation.
  3. Aging Skin: Humectants are used in anti-aging skincare products due to their ability to hydrate the skin and improve its appearance.
  4. Psoriasis: They can aid in reducing the dryness and scaling associated with psoriasis.
  5. Acne-Prone Skin: Certain humectants can be beneficial in acne treatments, as they provide necessary hydration without clogging pores.
References
  • Lodén, M. (2005). Role of Topical Emollients and Moisturizers in the Treatment of Dry Skin Barrier Disorders. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology.
  • Rawlings, A. V., & Canestrari, D. A. (2011). Moisturizer technology versus clinical performance. Dermatologic Therapy.
  • Fluhr, J. W., Darlenski, R., & Surber, C. (2008). Glycerol and the skin: holistic approach to its origin and functions. British Journal of Dermatology.

Ceramides

Ceramides, a family of lipid molecules naturally present in the skin, are integral to the structure and function of the skin barrier. They are a type of lipid that, along with cholesterol and fatty acids, forms a critical part of the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin. This layer is essential for maintaining skin hydration and protecting against environmental aggressors.

Ceramides, which make up about 50% of the skin's lipid composition, play a pivotal role in maintaining the skin's barrier integrity and preventing transepidermal water loss (TEWL). By doing so, they help keep the skin hydrated and supple.

The loss or reduction of ceramides in the skin barrier is associated with several dermatological conditions, including eczema and psoriasis, where the skin becomes dry, itchy, and prone to irritation and infection. Studies have shown that the application of ceramide-containing moisturizers can effectively improve skin barrier function and increase skin hydration levels.

Ceramides are particularly beneficial for aging skin, which naturally loses ceramides over time, leading to drier and more fragile skin. By replenishing the skin's ceramide content, these products can help combat the signs of aging, such as fine lines and wrinkles.

Ceramides are integral to maintaining skin health, particularly in conditions where the skin barrier is compromised. Their role in hydrating the skin, reducing sensitivity, and improving barrier function makes them an essential component in the management of various dermatological conditions, especially eczema, psoriasis, and dry or aging skin.

Physiological Effects of Ceramides
  1. Barrier Function: Ceramides are critical components of the skin's lipid barrier. They help to prevent moisture loss and protect against environmental aggressors like pollutants and irritants.
  2. Hydration: By maintaining the barrier integrity, ceramides keep the skin hydrated, preventing dryness and keeping the skin supple.
  3. Reducing Skin Sensitivity: They play a role in reducing skin sensitivity and irritation, helping to calm inflamed and reactive skin.
  4. Anti-aging Properties: Ceramides can improve skin elasticity and firmness, helping to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.
  5. Wound Healing: There is evidence to suggest that ceramides can aid in the skin's natural wound healing process.
Role in Managing Dermatological Conditions
  1. Eczema and Atopic Dermatitis: Ceramides are often used in the treatment of eczema and atopic dermatitis, where the skin barrier is compromised, leading to dryness, itching, and inflammation.
  2. Psoriasis: They can help in managing psoriasis by maintaining skin hydration and barrier function, reducing scaling and dryness.
  3. Aging Skin: Ceramide-containing products are beneficial in anti-aging regimens due to their ability to improve skin barrier function and elasticity.
  4. Dry Skin (Xerosis): In the treatment of dry skin, ceramides help in restoring skin hydration and barrier function.
  5. Sensitive Skin: Products containing ceramides are suitable for sensitive skin as they help to restore the skin's natural barrier and reduce irritation.
References
  • Del Rosso, J. Q., & Levin, J. (2011). The clinical relevance of maintaining the functional integrity of the stratum corneum in both healthy and disease-affected skin. Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology.
  • Farwanah, H., Wohlrab, J., Neubert, R. H. H., & Raith, K. (2005). Ceramides and skin function. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology.
  • Di Nardo, A., Wertz, P., Giannetti, A., & Seidenari, S. (1998). Ceramide and cholesterol composition of the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis. Acta Dermato-Venereologica.

Occlusives

Occlusives are a class of substances used in dermatology that work by forming a protective barrier on the surface of the skin. This barrier plays a crucial role in skin care and the management of various dermatological conditions.

Occlusives are a vital component in skincare, particularly for conditions characterized by impaired skin barrier function and excessive dryness. Their ability to lock in moisture and protect the skin from external irritants makes them invaluable in both therapeutic and preventive dermatology.

Physiological effects of Occlusives
  1. Moisture Retention: Occlusives reduce transepidermal water loss (TEWL) by creating a physical barrier over the skin, which traps moisture and prevents its evaporation, thereby keeping the skin hydrated.
  2. Skin Barrier Enhancement: They help in enhancing the skin's natural barrier function, protecting against environmental irritants and harmful substances.
  3. Soothing Effect: By preventing water loss and protecting the skin, occlusives can have a soothing effect, particularly on dry, irritated, or compromised skin.
  4. Improved Skin Texture: Regular use of occlusive agents can lead to improved skin texture, making the skin appear smoother and softer.
Role in Managing Dermatological Conditions
  1. Dry Skin Conditions (Xerosis): Occlusives are essential in the management of dry skin, helping to maintain hydration and reduce scaliness and itching.
  2. Eczema and Atopic Dermatitis: They are commonly used in the treatment of eczema and atopic dermatitis to hydrate the skin and reduce symptoms like itching and inflammation.
  3. Psoriasis: In psoriasis, occlusives can help in managing scaling and dryness, and are often used in combination with other topical treatments.
  4. Wound Healing: Occlusives can be used in wound care to maintain a moist environment, which is conducive to healing.
  5. Prevention of Irritant Contact Dermatitis: They protect the skin from irritants, especially in individuals with occupational exposures to harsh chemicals or frequent hand washing.
References
  • Rawlings, A. V., & Harding, C. R. (2004). Moisturization and skin barrier function. Dermatologic Therapy.
  • Lodén, M. (2003). Role of Topical Emollients and Moisturizers in the Treatment of Dry Skin Barrier Disorders. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology.
  • Proksch, E., & Lachapelle, J. M. (2005). The Management of Dry Skin with Topical Emollients. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology.

Emollients

Emollients play a crucial role in dermatological care, primarily by enhancing skin hydration and barrier function. Here's a brief overview of their physiological effects and roles in managing various skin conditions:

Physiological Effects of Emollients:
  1. Hydration of Stratum Corneum: Emollients increase moisture content in the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, by reducing transepidermal water loss (TEWL). This is achieved through occlusion, which traps water in the skin.
  2. Restoration of Skin Barrier Function: They aid in replenishing the lipid barrier of the skin, which is essential for maintaining skin integrity and protective function.
  3. Soothing and Smoothing Effects: Emollients smooth flaky skin cells, making the skin surface appear smoother. They also provide a soothing effect, which can reduce itching and discomfort.
  4. Anti-inflammatory Properties: Some emollients have ingredients that offer mild anti-inflammatory benefits, helping to reduce redness and irritation.
Role in Managing Dermatological Conditions:
  1. Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema): Emollients are a cornerstone in the management of eczema, helping to maintain skin hydration, reduce flare-ups, and minimize the need for topical corticosteroids.
  2. Psoriasis: Regular use of emollients can reduce scaling and dryness associated with psoriasis, improving the efficacy of other topical treatments.
  3. Ichthyosis and Xerosis: These conditions characterized by dry, scaly skin benefit significantly from emollients, which help in hydrating and softening the skin.
  4. Aging Skin: Emollients improve the appearance of aging skin by hydrating and reducing the visibility of fine lines and wrinkles.
  5. Skin Protection: In individuals with incontinence or those bedridden, emollients can protect the skin from irritation and breakdown.
References
  • Proksch, E., & Lachapelle, J. M. (2005). The Management of Dry Skin with Topical Emollients. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology.
  • Lynde, C. W. (2001). Moisturizers: What They Are and a Practical Approach to Product Selection. Skin Therapy Letter.
  • Lodén, M. (2003). Role of Topical Emollients and Moisturizers in the Treatment of Dry Skin Barrier Disorders. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology.

Sun Filters

The use of sunscreen is a fundamental aspect of skin care and preventive dermatology. It's essential not only for reducing the risk of skin cancers and photoaging but also for maintaining overall skin health in the face of constant exposure to UV radiation.

Sunscreen is a vital skincare product designed to protect the skin from the harmful effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. There are two primary types of UV radiation that affect the skin: UVA and UVB. UVA rays penetrate deep into the skin and are primarily responsible for aging and long-term skin damage, whereas UVB rays cause sunburn and play a key role in developing skin cancer.

Sunscreen products work by either absorbing, reflecting, or scattering sunlight. They contain chemical compounds that absorb UV radiation and convert it into a small amount of heat, or physical compounds (like zinc oxide or titanium dioxide) that act as a physical barrier, reflecting UV light away from the skin.

The effectiveness of sunscreen is measured by its Sun Protection Factor (SPF). SPF indicates how well the sunscreen protects against UVB rays. For example, an SPF of 30 means that it would take 30 times longer for your skin to burn than it would without sunscreen. However, it's important to note that no sunscreen can block 100% of UV rays.

Regular use of sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 can reduce the risk of skin cancer, prevent sunburn, and slow down the skin's aging process.

Prevention of Sunburn
  • UVB Protection: Sunscreen protects the skin from UVB rays, which are responsible for sunburn. This reduces the immediate risk of skin damage and discomfort.
Skin Cancer Prevention
  • Reduces Risk of Skin Cancers: Regular use of sunscreen significantly lowers the risk of developing various types of skin cancer, especially melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma.
Prevention of Photoaging
  • UVA Protection: Sunscreen also shields the skin from UVA rays, which penetrate deeper into the skin and are primarily responsible for photoaging, including wrinkles, leathery skin, and sunspots.
Protection Against Photosensitivity
  • Essential for Sensitive Skin Conditions: For individuals with photosensitive skin conditions like lupus or rosacea, sunscreen helps prevent flare-ups triggered by sun exposure.
Hyperpigmentation and Melasma
  • Even Skin Tone: It aids in preventing and managing hyperpigmentation and melasma, conditions exacerbated by sun exposure.
General Skin Health
  • Maintains Skin Health: By protecting the skin from UV damage, sunscreen helps maintain overall skin health and integrity.
References
  • Burnett, M. E., & Wang, S. Q. (2011). Current sunscreen controversies: a critical review. Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine.
  • Green, A. C., et al. (2011). Reduced melanoma after regular sunscreen use: randomized trial follow-up. Journal of Clinical Oncology.
  • Hughes, M. C. B., et al. (2013). Sunscreen and Prevention of Skin Aging: A Randomized Trial. Annals of Internal Medicine.

Niacinamide

Niacinamide offers several benefits for the skin, primarily due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. It has been shown to be effective in reducing the redness and inflammation associated with acne, rosacea, and other inflammatory skin conditions. Additionally, niacinamide's ability to improve the skin's barrier function makes it beneficial for all skin types, particularly for those with eczema or mature skin.

Another significant benefit of niacinamide is its role in reducing hyperpigmentation. Studies have shown that it can decrease the transfer of melanin to the skin's epidermis, helping to fade dark spots and even out skin tone.

Niacinamide also plays a role in reducing the visible signs of aging. It has been found to stimulate collagen production and improve skin elasticity, reducing fine lines and wrinkles. Its antioxidant properties further protect the skin from environmental damage, such as pollution and UV radiation, which contribute to premature aging.

The efficacy of niacinamide and its ability to address multiple skin concerns simultaneously has led to its growing popularity in both over-the-counter and prescription skincare formulations.

Physiological Effects of Niacinamide
  1. Barrier Function Enhancement: Niacinamide helps strengthen the skin’s barrier function by increasing the production of ceramides, which are lipids that keep the skin hydrated and protect against environmental damage.
  2. Anti-inflammatory Properties: It has notable anti-inflammatory effects, which are beneficial in reducing redness and inflammation associated with acne, eczema, and other inflammatory skin conditions.
  3. Sebum Regulation: Niacinamide can regulate sebum production, which helps in controlling excess oiliness and can be beneficial for acne-prone skin.
  4. Hyperpigmentation Reduction: It is known to reduce hyperpigmentation by inhibiting melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes, leading to an even skin tone.
  5. Anti-aging Effects: Niacinamide helps in reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles by boosting collagen production and improving skin elasticity.
  6. Antioxidant Activity: It has antioxidant properties, protecting the skin from oxidative stress and environmental aggressors like UV radiation and pollution.
Role in Managing Dermatological Conditions
  1. Acne and Oily Skin: By regulating sebum and reducing inflammation, niacinamide is effective in managing acne and oily skin conditions.
  2. Hyperpigmentation and Melasma: Its ability to reduce melanin transfer makes it beneficial in treating hyperpigmentation and melasma.
  3. Aging Skin: Its anti-aging properties make niacinamide a popular ingredient in skincare products targeting wrinkles and loss of firmness.
  4. Skin Barrier Disorders: Niacinamide is beneficial in the treatment of skin barrier disorders like atopic dermatitis and eczema, by enhancing barrier function and hydration.
  5. Photodamage and Skin Protection: It helps in mitigating the effects of photodamage and provides some degree of protection against environmental damage.
References
  • Gehring, W. (2004). Nicotinic acid/niacinamide and the skin. Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.
  • Bissett, D. L., Oblong, J. E., & Berge, C. A. (2005). Niacinamide: A B vitamin that improves aging facial skin appearance. Dermatologic Surgery.
  • Snaidr, V. A., Damian, D. L., & Halliday, G. M. (2019). Nicotinamide for photoprotection and skin cancer chemoprevention: A review of efficacy and safety. Experimental Dermatology.
  • Navarrete-Solís, J. et al. (2011). A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial of Niacinamide 4% versus Hydroquinone 4% in the Treatment of Melasma. Dermatology Research and Practice, 2011.

MORNING
EVENING
CLEANSE
REPAIR
MOISTURIZE

DETECZEMA - Mild Eczema

KEY TREATMENT OBJECTIVES

Barrier Repair

Restoring the skin's natural barrier function by utilizing specialized barrier-repair moisturizers that focus on repairing and strengthening the skin barrier is crucial. These products help your skin retain moisture and provide a defense against external irritants.

Managing Inflammation

Mild eczema often comes with inflammation, manifesting as redness or slight swelling. Anti-inflammatory skincare products can offer significant relief, reducing redness and soothing the skin.

Intensive Hydration

Employ high-potency moisturizers that offer deep hydration and barrier repair functionalities, due to the skin's impaired ability to retain moisture.

Trigger Avoidance

Identify and avoid known triggers such as allergens, irritants, and environmental factors that can exacerbate symptoms.

INCLUDE

  • Anti-Inflammatory agents like niacinamide help manage minor inflammations and keep the skin calm.
  • Broad spectrum sunscreen with antioxidants - preventing premature aging and protecting DNA.
  • Ceramide-Enriched Moisturizers that will reinforce the skin barrier.
  • Emollients that will fill the gaps between skin cells, helping to replace lost moisture.
  • Gentle Cleanser that reinforce your skin's natural barrier while maintaining hydration levels.
  • Humectants that attract water to the skin.
  • ,Ointments with Occlusive Agents that creates a physical barrier over the skin - locking in moisture.

AVOID

  • Extreme Temperatures - Both blazing heat and frigid cold can wreak havoc on your skin.
  • Over-Exfoliation and scrubbing will damage your skin barrier.
  • Pay attention to potential allergens in your environment—dust; pet dander; or certain foods.
  • Soaps, cleansers or lotions with sulfates, alcohol or synthetic fragrances.
  • Stress and Anxiety.
  • Tight clothing and synthetic fabrics that can irritate the skin.
  • UV rays that can not only cause harm but can also trigger eczema flare-ups.